Here at the Polish-Ukrainian border, I see nothing but humanity towards refugees | Anastasia Lapatina

Polish people are hosting Ukrainians in their apartments, driving them to places, or simply giving them money to cover basic needsAnastasia Lapatina is a journalist at Tthe Kyiv IndependentWhen I hopped on a train from Krakow to Przemyśl, a small Polish town near the Ukrainian border, I expected to be confronted with a humanitarian catastrophe, produced by a million people fleeing their homes due to war. But what I saw was instead the best of humanity.As Russia has launched a bloody full-scale war against my country, thousands of Ukrainians have escaped by train to this railway station. There, they are met by an enormous banner in front of its entrance that reads, in bothPolish and Ukrainian: “You are safe here.” Inside, dozens of Polish volunteers provide Ukrainian refugees with “everything for free”, as another sign says – food, water, clothes, phones with prepaid plans, accommodation, legal advice. While I was there, the volunteers mingled among the crowds, helping displaced Ukrainians find food, hot beverages and somewhere to sit. Little islands of people surrounded power extensions, clinging to their phones for news and texts from loved ones who were still in Ukraine. Continue reading…

Polish people are hosting Ukrainians in their apartments, driving them to places, or simply giving them money to cover basic needs

  • Anastasia Lapatina is a journalist at Tthe Kyiv Independent

When I hopped on a train from Krakow to Przemyśl, a small Polish town near the Ukrainian border, I expected to be confronted with a humanitarian catastrophe, produced by a million people fleeing their homes due to war. But what I saw was instead the best of humanity.

As Russia has launched a bloody full-scale war against my country, thousands of Ukrainians have escaped by train to this railway station. There, they are met by an enormous banner in front of its entrance that reads, in bothPolish and Ukrainian: “You are safe here.” Inside, dozens of Polish volunteers provide Ukrainian refugees with “everything for free”, as another sign says – food, water, clothes, phones with prepaid plans, accommodation, legal advice. While I was there, the volunteers mingled among the crowds, helping displaced Ukrainians find food, hot beverages and somewhere to sit. Little islands of people surrounded power extensions, clinging to their phones for news and texts from loved ones who were still in Ukraine.

Continue reading…

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